It can feel uncomfortable, but sharing information about your SBS can help others better understand your situation. Read more about how to talk to others about SBS."

Talking About Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) with Others"

WHEN YOU HAVE SBS, TALKING ABOUT IT CAN BE A CHALLENGE

Kevin, a patient
living with SBS

THOUGH IT CAN FEEL UNCOMFORTABLE, SHARING INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR CONDITION CAN HELP OTHERS BETTER UNDERSTAND YOUR SITUATION.



TALKING ABOUT SBS WITH OTHERS

It can be difficult to talk about SBS with those in your life. Discussing exactly how SBS affects you can be embarrassing or make you feel vulnerable or isolated. But talking to those who are important to you can help them understand your situation which can ultimately benefit you.

WHO TO TALK TO

You might not want to share all the details of your condition with everyone — and you don’t have to! Telling someone about your condition is your choice.

Consider speaking with family, friends, and even your boss and coworkers. You can always share more with those you feel most comfortable with and less with those you don’t know as intimately.

While it may feel uncomfortable discussing certain aspects of your condition, talking to people who are close to you about your diagnosis can help them understand what you’re going through, as well as what they can expect. Knowing more about it will allow them to be more supportive and have a better understanding of how they can help.

The video below features Kevin, a patient with SBS, describing how he has talked about SBS to others.

TALKING TO YOUR EMPLOYER

While it might feel awkward to discuss your medical situation with your employer, it may benefit you. If you choose to share your condition, you can discuss ways to make arrangements that will help you succeed at work. Consider asking for your desk or work area to be moved closer to the restroom or even possibly for access to work from home on occasion.

Norma, a short bowel syndrome (SBS) patient

“It’s always difficult to try and explain to someone what life is like with SBS. But my boss was very understanding when I told him about it.”

- Norma, SBS patient

WHAT TO REMEMBER

It can be challenging to find the right balance between maintaining your privacy and sharing enough to help you get the support you need. But you don’t have to tell everyone everything. Whom you talk to and what you tell them is completely up to you. Consider telling your closest friends and family members first to get more comfortable talking about SBS, then move on to the others in your life who you want to tell.

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